Mineral Wool

Mineral Wool is the ultimate thermal insulator and sound absorbent. Limiting heat transfer thus reducing fuel consumption when used in roofs, partitions and suspended ceilings.

Mineral wool is also known as mineral fiber, mineral cotton, mineral fibre, man-made mineral fibre (MMMF), and man-made vitreous fiber (MMVF).

Specific mineral wool products are stone wool and slag wool. Europe also includes glass wool which, together with ceramic fiber, are completely man-made fibers.

Excellent Insulators

Though the individual fibers conduct heat very well, when pressed into rolls and sheets, their ability to partition air makes them excellent insulators and sound absorbers. The fire resistance of fiberglass, stone wool, and ceramic fibers makes them common building materials when passive fire protection is required, being used as spray fireproofing, in stud cavities in drywall assemblies and as packing materials in firestops.

Thermal Insulation
The thermal performance of mineral wool is mainly due to prevention of convection by the entrapment of air in the material’s open-cell, woolly matrix. Conduction is reduced because there is very little solid material to provide pathways and the trapped, static air has a low thermal conductivity. Heat transfer is also reduced because the material acts as a physical barrier to radiative processes.

Glass and stone mineral wool insulates by trapping and holding air still. It does not rely on injected gas that can leak and result in a deterioration in thermal performance.

Acoustic Insulation
Porous materials such as mineral wool work to control and reduce noise by allowing air movement into the fabric of the material. The fluctuations of air molecules - which form sound waves - move into the body of the mineral wool, where friction between the air particles and the material’s narrow airways cause sound energy to be dissipated as heat.



Top Brand Insulation At Affordable Prices

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